Geographically distributed multi-master replication with PostgreSQL and BDR

Presented by Craig Ringer
Thursday 2:35 p.m.–3:20 p.m. in Medium Lecture Theatre CB11.00.401
Target audience: User

Abstract

Keeping your data in more than one place is vital for business continuity, and databases are no exception. Backups are great, but they won't help you when your normally-connected EU, US and Australian operations all want to continue operating during a major WAN outage. This is where multi-master replication systems come into their own - but they also come with often overlooked costs and downsides. Bi-Directional Replication (BDR) for PostgreSQL can help solve some users' availability challenges in a globally distributed environment... if it's applied correctly. Multi-master is not magic high availability secret-sauce that can be applied to every problem, no matter what some major vendors' sales teams would like you to believe. Learn about when to use - and not to use - multi-master replication in general, and BDR in particular. When is it better to stick to a single-master system with failover? If you do select a multi-master system, what kind is best for you? Do you need something partition- and latency-tolerant, or something tightly coupled and transparent? Shared-mostly or shared-nothing? These details will have a major impact on whether a given system architecture can meet your needs, and understanding them will help you set better requirements during a design and product selection process.

Presented by

Craig Ringer

Craig is a PostgreSQL developer with particular interests in replication, usability, and user experience. He's spent the last few years focused on multi-master replication for PostgreSQL and on Bi-Directional Replication for Postgres (BDR) in particular. Craig enjoys development, documentation, writing and support, and tries to maintain a broad perspective of a variety of real world user needs. He believes that it's important not to let developers get too isolated from the end user and the challenges they face.